Random Stories

Deep in the heart of Lowden’s farming land is a canyon that has uncovered many mysteries around the Missoula Floods. Burlingame Canyon is over 1,500 feet long, and cuts down about 100 feet. Not only is this canyon a visual wonder, it has played a key…

At the confluence of the Palouse and Snake Rivers, the Lyons Ferry area, an immense gravel bar formed from the flow of the monumental Missoula flood waters, as shown in Figure 1 (Bretz et al, 1956; Baker, 1973; Busacca, 1989). The Missoula…

Imagine walking along the countryside in late August and coming across brightly colored purple flowers. Small basal leaves form rosettes while the blooms have thistles that are in full swing July through September. This small flower may look like a…

Looking at the path of the Palouse River today, we might find it hard to imagine the river didn’t always flow down its current path, but instead was diverted some 15,000 years ago by a series of at least 40 catastrophic floods known today as the…

J Harlen Bretz, whose given name was Harley J. Bretz, was born in 1882 in Michigan. The oldest of five children, Bretz had an early interest in astronomy and the natural environment that surrounded him on the farm where he grew up. Originally…

Ice Age Floods Explorer

Ice Age Floods Explorer is a web and mobile platform for telling stories of the Missoula Floods and is an ongoing endevour focusing on student research. Ice Age Floods Explorer is a project of the Public History program and Department of Geology at Eastern Washington University. Most of the stories were created by EWU students. Co-editors are Drs. Chad Pritchard, Larry Cebula, and Paul Lindholdt from Eastern Washington University. Dr. Chad Pritchard is an Assistant Professor in the Geology Department. Dr. Larry Cebula is Editor of Spokane Historical. He is a Professor of History at Eastern Washington University and the Assistant Digital Archivist for the State of Washington. Dr. Paul Lindholdt is a Professor or English. Assistant Edit... Read more About Us