Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.

Ice Age Floods Explorer

All Stories: 51

Looking at the Palouse River cascade over Palouse falls is a splendid sight. But when furry head pops out of the rocks, it is always a joy. Over many visits to Palouse Falls State Park, I have seen one marmot, though one trip he had a friend over. …

The breathtaking falls in front of you formed from a series of cataclysmic events. The Palouse Falls stands at 197 feet tall and is the product of several geologic phenomena that are prevalent in the Columbia Plateau. The Palouse River slowly…

Palouse Falls State Park, located 18 miles southeast of Washtucna, is a beautiful recreational campground that offers a breathtaking view of the Palouse Falls. The Palouse Falls and the surrounding land were carved out by the ice age floods that…

Palouse village, known to the local tribes as Naha'u'umpu'u, or "People of the River," was one of the oldest sites of the Palus (or Palouse) Indians of the Pacific Northwest. It is located at the confluence of the Snake River and Palouse Falls and…

The Bank of Starbuck has stood for over 100 years and looks ahead for the next century. When the bank was constructed in 1904, there were no federal protections for depositors. What kept money safe were the strong walls for protection. In…

Standing at the overlook of Palouse Falls, visitors can see that the basaltic rocks that make up the canyon have some sort of story to tell. These black rocks are part of the continental flood basalt province known as the Columbia River Basalt Group…

The Fryxell Overlook is a wonderful viewpoint to see Palouse Falls and the Palouse River. The gazebo is dedicated to R.H. Fryxell and located a short hike south of the parking lot at Palouse Falls State Park. While you are standing there gazing at…

Looking at the path of the Palouse River today, we might find it hard to imagine the river didn’t always flow down its current path, but instead was diverted some 15,000 years ago by a series of at least 40 catastrophic floods known today as the…

At first glance it may not appear that the remote farming town of Starbuck, Washington, contains much geology. However, the unique slackwater deposits of the Tucannon Valley are perfectly exposed on the western side of town. The most notable feature…

Share this Page